Monday, November 23, 2015

Argentinian Corn Empanadas


Empanadas originated in Portugal and the Galatia region of Spain.  People believe the idea was derived from Indian Samosas.  In Galatia and Portugal, empanadas are made the size of a pie, and people eat wedges of it.


The word empanada comes from the Spanish and Portuguese word empanar, which means to wrap.  They are eaten throughout south and central America.  This corn version is from Argentina.  

Argentinean empanadas can be filled with raisins, olives, boiled eggs, fish, or sweet corn, among other things.  The pastry is made with beef drippings, which sounds delicious.  I didn't make my crust, but I'll have to remember that for future empanadas.  Argentina also has an "Arabian" empanadas that are filled with beef, tomatoes, and onion. 


Columbian empanadas have a crunchy cornmeal exterior.  Savory empanadas from Costa Rica are also made with a corn or plantain dough.  Costa Ricans make a sweet empanada filled with dulce de leche.  Empanadas are called pastelitos in El Salvador.  Their corn dough is red because of achiote powder.


Chileans eat a fried empanada that is filled with fish.  They also eat cheese filled empanadas.  Bolivian empanadas often contained potatoes, peas, and carrots.  There are so many delicious empanada possibilities!


This corn empanada recipe came from from Food Network.  The ingredients are 1 tablespoon corn oil, 1 medium yellow onion, 1 cup frozen corn, 1/4 cup roasted red peppers, salt, better, 1/2 cup shredded Mozzarella cheese, 1/8 cup milk, 10 to 12 empanada shells, and 1 egg.


I added the oil to a hot pan.  I sauteed the finely chopped onion for three minutes.  I added the con and diced roasted red peppers.





I sauteed the corn and peppers for five minutes.  I added salt and pepper.  I let these ingredients cool to room temperature.


I combined the cheese and milk.


I added the corn mixture and stirred thoroughly.  


I lined a baking tray with parchment paper.  I added a heaping spoon of the filling on each empanada round.  I folded the dough in half over the filling and pressed the outer edges together with my fingers.



I repeated the filling, folding, and pressing nine more times.



I covered the empanadas with a beaten egg.  


I baked the empanadas at 375 degrees for 20 minutes.  I let them cool a little before digging in.



These were scrumptious.  The filling was flavorful, hearty, and cheesy.


The crust was crisp and golden on the outside.


These were hearty, especially considering they contain no meat.


 They were quick and simple to make.  I enjoyed them immensely, and I'm sure you would too.


2 comments:

Kelly - Life Made Sweeter said...

These empanadas sound fantastic! Love the corn!

laura said...

Thanks Kelly!